Tag Archives: nursing history

“A Vivid Testimony”

“History provides current nurses with the same intellectual and political tools that determined nursing pioneers applied to shape nursing values and beliefs to the social context of their times. Nursing history is not an ornament to be displayed on anniversary days, nor does it consist of only happy stories to be recalled and retold on special occasions. Nursing history is a vivid testimony, meant to incite, instruct, and inspire today’s nurses as they bravely tread the winding path of a reinvented health care system.” (American Association for History of Nursing)

SHINING A LIGHT ON THE PRESENT AND FUTURE

We need nurse historians–those researchers who can help us understand the present and future by examining the past!

ebook cover

MY PROJECT just published (amazon/apple books/kindle): A Time to Heal: Missionary Nurses in Churches of Christ, Southeastern Nigeria (1953-1967). I like to think of the work as accessible history told from the point of view of those who lived it. A take-away for me from their story is: Don’t let your current inexperience or limited knowledge stop you from doing the good you see to do.

MORE INFO: Check out the resources of the American Association for History of Nursing. “Talking History” events online are the current norm, so check them out and join us.

Sat Jan 23, 2021Webinar | Public Health and DisasterCategory: Webinar
Fri Jan 29, 2021PhD Student Networking CallCategory: Events
Sat Feb 20, 2021Webinar | Midwifery and RaceCategory: Webinar
Fri Mar 19, 2021Webinar | Nursing EductationCategory: Webinar
Fri Apr 16, 2021Webinar | War and NursingCategory: Webinar

Useful…but not enough!

Homemade masks: 1918 & 2020

This Op Ed from Am Assoc for History of Nursing website by Marian Moser Jones
University of Maryland School of Public Health
moserj@umd.edu

Check it out & share your perspective: https://www.aahn.org/home-made-masks–useful-but-not-enough-in-1918–useful-but-not-enough-now

Nightingale: Avante garde in meaningful data

In honor of Nurse Week, I offer this tribute to the avante garde research work of Florence Nightingale in the Crimea that saved lives and set a precedent worth following.

Nightingale was a “passionate statistician” knowing that outcome data are convincing when one wants to change the world.  She did not merely collect the data, but also documented it in a way that revealed its critical meaning for care.

As noted by John H. Lienhard (1998-2002): Nightingale coxcombchart“Once you see Nightingale’s graph, the terrible picture is clear. The Russians were a minor enemy. The real enemies were cholera, typhus, and dysentery. Once the military looked at that eloquent graph, the modern army hospital system was inevitable.  You and I are shown graphs every day. Some are honest; many are misleading….So you and I could use a Florence Nightingale today, as we drown in more undifferentiated data than anyone could’ve imagined during the Crimean War.” (Source: Leinhard, 1998-2002)

As McDonald (2001) writes in the BMJ free, full-text,  Nightingale was “a systemic thinker and a “passionate statistician.”  She insisted on improving care by making policy & care decisions based on “the best available government statistics and expertise, and the collection of new material where the existing stock was inadequate.”(p.68)

Moreover, her display of the data brought its message home through visual clarity!

Thus while Nightingale adhered to some well-accepted, but mistaken, scientific theories of the time (e.g., miasma) her work was superb and scientific in the best sense of the word.   We could all learn from Florence.

CRITICAL THINKING:   What issue in your own practice could be solved by more data?  How could you collect that data?   If you have data already, how can you display it so that it it meaningful to others and “brings the point home”?

FOR MORE INFO:

HAPPY NURSE WEEK TO ALL MY COLLEAGUES.  

MAY YOU GO WHERE THE DATA TAKES YOU!